Researchers

 

Jose L. Lado holds a Degree in Physics (2012) and a Master Degree in Material Science and Technology (2013), both awarded by the University of Santiago de Compostela.
As an undergraduate student, in his last year he worked on the development of computational techniques based on density functional theory (DFT). He performed a Summer Scholarship at INL in 2012, where he developed tight binding computational tools for studying Quantum Hall effect in graphene. As a Master Degree student in 2013, he studied oxide-based topological insulators using DFT techniques.
In October 2013 he joined the Theory of Nanostructures Group as a PhD student within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network, where his research will be focused on "Modeling spin transport and control in devices of graphene and other 2D crystals". Here a brief description of his PhD project:
 

Modeling Spin Transport and Control in Devices of Graphene and other 2D Crystals

The goal of this project is to understand the generation and control of spin currents in 2D dimensional systems using existing computational and theoretical techniques as well as developing new ones. The generation of pure spin currents holds the promise of dissipationless electronics and is being actively explored in a wide class of magnetic materials. The generation of spin currents in graphene and related two dimensional materials is related to the exotic properties of their conduction electrons, that behave like Dirac particles.

In addition,  graphene was initially proposed to behave as a Quantum Spin Hall Insulator (or two dimensional topological insulator) which makes it a good candidate for a material to transport spin currents. In this project we shall study of topological properties, piezospintronics effects, spin-relaxation mechanisms in graphene and similar two dimensional systems, having in mind the possibility of inducing and controlling pure spin currents without charge flow.

 

Jose L. Sambricio holds a Degree in Physics (2013) awarded by the Autonomous University of Madrid. He also spent one year at Leiden University thanks to an exchange program.
As part of his degree he studied Magnetic Tunneling Junctions (MTJ) with ultra-thin barries. In his last year at Leiden, he also studied graphene production by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) on copper. 
He recently joined the University of Manchester as part of the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Netwrork. He will be a PhD student in the Condensed Matter Group. His research will be focused on "Graphene-based hybrid devices for spintronics". Here a brief description of his PhD project:
 

Graphene-based Hybrid Devices for Spintronics

The main aim of this project is to use new functionalities made possible by combining different types of 2D materials with different characteristics (ferromagnetic, semiconductors…) into heteroestructures.

The first task is to fabricate and control Magnetic Tunneling Junctions and other devices such as Spin Valves based on graphene or other 2D materials. This kind of devices has important applications in hard drives or MRAM (Magnetic Random Access Memory).

 

 

Noel A. García holds a Degree in Physics (2011) and a Master Degree in Condensed Matter Physics and Nanotechnology (2012), both by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM).
In the Master Degree thesis he studied iron based superconductors, focusing in the electron-phonon interaction. These studies were continued for a year while he worked at the Material Science Institute of Madrid (ICMM-CSIC). In January 2014 he joined the Theory of Nanostructures Group as a PhD student within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network, where his research will be focused on "DFT calculations for graphene and other 2D crystals: defects, adsorbates and spin-proximity".
 

DFT Calculations for Graphene and other 2D Crystals: Defects, Adsorbates and Spin-proximity

The goal of this project is to model the influence of defects, adsorbates and the substrate on the spin properties of 2D crystals such as graphene, MoS2 and related materials, combining density functional theory (DFT) calculations with other approaches. The thesis underlying this project is that 2D crystals are all surface, which in principle should make them very sensitive to the presence adsorbates. 
 
More specifically, we shall focus on the following problems: 
  - Influence of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen on the spin lifetime and spin Hall of transport electrons in graphene, because of the enhancement of spin orbit coupling.
  - Enhancement of the spin relaxation in graphene due to spin scattering with chemisorbed atomic hydrogen.
  - Study of the electronic properties of multilayers that combine ferromagnetic materials and two dimensional crystals, looking both for spin proximity effect and Landau quantization, and how these reflect in transport properties.
 

 

Mário O. Ribeiro holds a Master Degree in Engineering Physics (2011), awarded by the University of Aveiro.
As an undergraduate student, his project concerned the optical and structural characterization of zirconia fibers produced by laser floating zone.  As a master student, he dealt with the FMR characterization of spin re-orientation transitions in NdCo5 thin films produced by pulsed laser deposition.
After graduation, he worked in Nanium S.A, the largest European pure play packaging foundry as a wafer level packaging R&D engineer, with responsibilities in package development, process integration, material management, and implementing and introducing new technologies.
In March 2014, he joined CIC nanoGUNE as a PhD student within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network, where his research will be focused on "Control of spin injection and spin transport in graphene and other 2D crystals by molecular decoration”.
 

Control of Spin Injection and Spin Transport in Graphene and other 2D Crystals by Molecular Decoration 

The main goal of this project is the characterization of graphene and other semiconducting layered material spin valves, in which the spin transport properties will be tuned by the interaction of the electronic carriers with different molecular species.
 

 

 

Wenjing Yan holds a bachelor and a master degree in Materials Science from the University of Oxford (2010). Afterwards, she joined a PhD program in the Device Materials Group at the University of Cambridge.
During the PhD, she tested the transport properties of graphene spin valves fabricated usinghighly spin polarisedepitaxial La2/3Sr1/3MnO3electrodes and mechanical exfoliated graphene / few-layer graphene channel.
In March 2014, she became a member of the Nanodevices group at CIC nanoGUNE within theSPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network. There, her research will be focused on ´Tuning the functionality of Graphene and other 2D layered structures with spin-orbit coupling´
 

Tuning the Functionality of Graphene and other 2D Layered Structures with Spin-orbit Coupling  

The aim of this project is to understand the effect of spin-orbit coupling mediated from, for example, a ferromagnetic insulator, on the transport property of graphene and other similar 2D crystals. Graphene has weak spin orbit coupling, which makes it a good candidate for long distance spin transport. But to explore more exotic properties of graphene, one needs to have the ability to finely tune its transport property. This project approaches this by measuring the transport property of graphene when it is in proximity with a material that has large spin orbit coupling.
 

 

Denis Bandurin graduated from the Faculty of Physics of M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University with specialization in Nanosystems and Nanodevices in January 2014. 
In 2012 he participated in DESY Student Summer Program in Hamburg where he worked on Thomson Scattering on Warm Dense Matter. His diploma thesis at the university was dedicated to the investigation of field emission properties of various nanocarbons: carbon nanotubes, nanowalls, graphene, etc. He spent one semester at the University of Wuppertal thanks to grant of an individual scholarship where he worked on field-emission spectroscopy of nanographite films. 
In March 2014 he joined Condensed Matter Physics Group of the University of Manchester as a Ph.D. student within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network
 

Intrinsic Magnetism in Graphene and its control using molecular doping and field effect  

The aim of the project is to engineer magnetic properties of graphene by means of controlled introduction of atomic-scale defects, such as vacancies or adatoms, and to control the induced magnetism by chemical or electrostatic doping. The work will involve fabrication of graphene samples and devices, subsequent functionalization and high-energy ion irradiation and finally magnetization and transport measurements on functionalized/defected graphene.
 

 

Christian Alvino holds a master in Physics from the University of Modena (2009). Afterwards, he joined the PhD school in Nano and physical sciences at the University of Modena. 
During the PhD, he studies the transport properties of graphene and hybrid graphene-magnetic nanoparticles devices.
In January 2014, he became a member of Graphene SA within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network. His research will be focused on "Synthesis and transfer of graphene films suitable for spintronic applications".  
 

Synthesis and Transfer of Graphene Films suitable for spintronic applications  

The aim of the project is to synthesize graphene using CVD techniques on copper catalysts and transfer it onto a variety of substrates: Si/SiO2,  hBN, etc. Moreover, the project will focus on the optimization of growth and transfer process to scale-up to 4” wafer scale.
 

 

 
Luis A. González-Árraga holds a Degree in Physics (Universidad del Zulia, Venezuela) and a Master Degree in Physics (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Venezuela, 2012).  As an undergraduate student he studied the resonant tunneling of Dirac particles by double potential barriers (http://arxiv.org/abs/1001.4712). As a Master Degree student, his thesis consisted of a theoretical project dealing with the generation of spin polarized currents in 2DEG via decoherent coupling to electron reservoirs (http://arxiv.org/abs/1212.0497). 
In February 2014, he joined the Models for Graphene group at ICMM, as a PhD student within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network, his research will be focused on "Spin-orbit coupling in graphene layers on heavy atom substrates”.  As of January 2015 he joined IMDEA NANOSCIENCE, new partner of SPINOGRAPH.
 

Spin-orbit coupling in graphene layers on heavy atom substrates

The main objectives of  his PhD project are the study of electronic states and spin relaxation rates of graphene on substrates with strong spin-orbit coupling  induced by the intercalation of heavy atoms (such as Pb, Au), as well as the study of  electronic localization by inhomogeneous spin-orbit coupling.
 

 

 

 
Josep Ingla Aynés holds a Degree in Physics (2012) and a Master in nanoscience and nanotechnology (2013) by the University of Barcelona (UB).
As an undergraduate student, he worked on surface caracterization of fluorinated and nanostructured diamond-like carbon layers. As a master student, he worked in the development of a photonic crystal with graphene using a silica nanoparticle monolayer assembly. He also worked in CVD graphene on SiO2 using Cu and Ni\Cu sputtered layers.
In February 2014 he joined the Physics of nanodevices group as a PhD student within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network, where his research will be focused on "Spin transport and spin dynamics in optimized grapgene devices".
 

Spin transport and spin dynamics in optimized graphene devices

The goal of this project is to use the fast pick up technique described in (arXiv:1403.0399v1) to obtain high quality graphene-based spintronic devices and explore different physical phenomena involved in the charge and spin transport through this systems. More specifically, we will focus on the transport properties of bilayer graphene nonlocal spin valves where we control the carrier density and the transverse electric field through a top and a back gate.
We are also interested in using boron nitride as a tunnel barrier to carry out spin transport measurements.
 

 

 
Francesca Finocchiaro holds a Degree in Physics (2009) and a Master Degree in Condensed Matter Physics (2013) both awarded by the University of Rome La Sapienza. Her Master Thesis was focused on the investigation of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and BCS superconductivity as charge instability mechanisms in the 2D electron gas arising at the interface of oxides heterostructures. In March 2014 she joined the ICMM-CSIC (Material Science Institute of Madrid) as a PhD student within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network, where her research will be mainly focused on spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation in graphene and dichalcogenides. As of January 2015 she joined IMDEA NANOSCIENCE, new partner of SPINOGRAPH.
 

Spin-orbit coupling and spin relaxation in graphene and dichalcogenides

The main goal of this project is to model and understand theoretically how impurities and vacancies affect the spin transport properties of 2D systems such as graphene and dichalcogenides and to investigate SOC-related spin relaxation mechanisms, in particular in the promising case where the spin is entangled to the valley degree of freedom as it happens in p-doped dichalcogenides. One of the focuses of the project is the microscopical determination of the relaxation times associated to different scattering mechanisms involving spin and/or valley flipping and the determination of the weak localization/antilocalization regimes the system falls into according to the doping regime and to the relative magnitude of the different scattering times.
 

 

 
Johannes Christian Leutenantsmeyer studied physics at the University of Göttingen where he obtained a Bachelor of Science (2011) and a Master of Science degree (2013) in solid-state physics. In 2014 he was awarded with the Berliner-Ungewitter-Prize of the Faculty of Physics for his graduation in Physics. His research was focused on the spin-transport in CoFeB/MgO-based spin-valves and their optimization with respect to the magneto-resistive behavior and the critical current for (thermal) spin-transfer torque switching.
In August 2014 he joined the Physics of Nanodevices group at Groningen University and the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network. His project explores ferromagnetic proximity effect and magnetism in graphene spin valves.
 

Ferromagnetic proximity effect and magnetism in graphene spin valves

The effect of magnetic proximity describes the transfer of magnetism through the contact interface between a ferromagnet and an initially non-magnetic material. Such a modification affects the electron spin, which is an intrinsic property of electrons to be used in the next generation of electronics, the so-called spintronics. However, the transfer of magnetism decays within only a few atomic layers from the contact interface and such an effect can be only observed in ultimately thin films. Emergence of on atomic layer thin graphene offers an ideal testing system for the influence of the proximity effect on electronic and spin-transport.
 

 

 

Mehrdad Shaygan  holds a PhD degree in the Nanotechnology/Nanoelectronics (2014) from Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), South Korea. During his PhD, he has been working on different types of Nanomaterial such as (Graphene and Nanowires) and their potential application in Nanoelectronics and NEMS/MEMS devices, including Field Effect Transistors and Optoelectronic Devices.

In January 2015 he joined Advanced Microelectronic Center Aachen, AMO GmbH, as a postdoctoral research fellow within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network, where his research will be focused on "Fabrication of spin-injection layers on graphene".

Fabrication of spin-injection layers on graphene

The main goal of this project is fabrication and characterization of spin-injection layers on graphene via deposition of thin dielectric layers on graphene acting as tunnelling barriers for spin injection to realize the effect of ferromagnetic metal contacts on the dielectric layers. This would lead in to understand the limits of tunneling barriers on graphene and the effect of the barrier type on the properties of graphene and the spin-injection

 

 

Regina Galceran Vercher holds a PhD degree in Materials Science from the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), Spain. The topic of her PhD was the spin-dependent transport in oxide-based tunnel junctions. 

In April 2015 she joined the Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales (UMR 137) as a postdoctoral research fellow within the SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network. Her research will focus on the optimization of spin transport in graphene-based vertical and lateral devices.
 

Spin transport in graphene-based vertical and lateral devices, exchange and spin-orbit effects

This project focuses on the fabrication and characterization of spintronics devices on SiC or CVD graphene. The main goal is the modification of spin transport in graphene –under the influence of exchange or spin-orbit effects achieved by measurement of magnetoresistance signal in the device.
 

 
Julian Peiro holds a bachelor degree in Fundamental and Applied Physics from the Paris Sud University (Paris-Saclay) and a Master degree in Material Science and Engineering from INSA Rennes Graduate School. Afterward he joined the PhD School of Material Physics and Chemistry at Pierre et Marie Curie University (Paris) in the frame of which he conducted his PhD at the Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales (UMR 137) on the topic of Injection and Detection of Spin polarized current into semiconductors. His studies particularly focused on the influence of contact interfaces on relaxation and on the reinterpretation of Hanle and Inverted Hanle spin-signals. 
In July 2014, Julian joined the Graphene spintronics group of RWTH Aachen University as a Postdoctoral Researcher within the Spinograph frame, where his research will explore the spin physics in high quality and low-dimension graphene devices.
 

Fabrication of graphene nanodevices for studying spin physics

In the past decade, many fabrication technology improvements allowed to study high quality graphene nanodevices and address outstanding electrical transport properties predicted theoretically and fundamental quantum effects.
The ambition of this project is to develop highly tunable graphene nanostructures quantum dot devices for spintronics. For this project, very high quality graphene nanostructures will be fabricated to investigate the influence of the low-dimensionality of graphene nanostructures on non-local spin transport. This will give a fundamental knowledge to understand spin transport into sophisticated nanodevices like graphene quantum dots.
 

 
Sowmya Somanchi has completed her Integrated Master of Science degree in Physics from the University of Hyderabad, India in 2014. For her Master thesis, she worked on large scale synthesis of graphene by electrochemical exfoliation of graphite in aqueous electrolytes. During summer 2013, she was awarded the DST- DFG Post Lindau fellowship to undertake a research internship at Juelich Forschungszentrum. She worked on transport and hysteresis effects in carbon nanotube based transistors. In July, 2014, she joined Prof. Stampfer’s goup at RWTH Aachen University as a Ph.D. student (ESR) within the framework of SPINOGRAPH Marie Curie Initial Training Network. Her research is primarily focused on exploring spin states and relaxation in graphene quantum devices.

Spin states and relaxation in graphene quantum devices

Graphene quantum dots have been identified as potential candidates for quantum computation. Due to weak spin-orbit and hyperfine interactions, graphene is predicted to have long spin coherence life-times. In this context, electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) is a powerful technique to investigate and control the spin states and life-times. The major aim of the project is to explore properties of individual spins and investigate the factors limiting the relaxation time of single electron spins in graphene quantum dots.